Tag Archives: sensitive teeth

Dental Pain

Dental Pain

Everything seems fine, then all of sudden your tooth starts to ache. Or your mouth starts to hurt. Let’s be serious, dental pain is no fun.

If you’re wondering why does this happen, here are some explanations to common types of dental pain.

My tooth hurts when I eat/drink something hot or cold.
Depending on the cause of the sensitivity, treatment can be as simple as switching toothpaste. A toothpaste specifically designed for sensitive teeth can provide relief and long-lasting protection for sensitive teeth. In other cases, a root canal or gum grafting may be needed to give you the comfort you needed.

My tooth hurts when I eat or bite down.
When a tooth hurts while eating, it can be a sign of tooth decay or a cracked/fractured tooth. Your dentist can diagnose the source of the pain, treat it, and allow you to heal properly, leaving you with a pain-free smile.

My tooth is throbbing.
Intense, throbbing pain can indicate that your tooth is infected. If you are experiencing this pain with swelling, seek the attention of a dentist immediately. Your dentist can properly treat the infection before it spreads to other parts of your mouth or body.

My teeth are fine, but my jaw hurts.
Jaw pain can be a symptom of teeth clenching or grinding at night, impacted wisdom teeth, or temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). Dental appliances can be made to stabilize your bite and help determine what, if any, further dental treatments may be needed to keep you comfortable and pain free.

If you are experiencing oral pain or have any questions about it, you can contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Do You Have Jaw Pain or Headaches?

Jaw Pain or Headaches

If you experience jaw pain, headaches, or have difficulty opening your mouth, you may have a TMJ disorder. Our dental team can determine if your bite may be a factor and help you feel comfortable again.

Temporomandibular joints (TMJ), are the joints that attach your jaws to your skull. These joints allow us to open and close our mouth, swallow, chew, and speak. When these joints, muscles, and teeth are not properly aligned, painful conditions such as TMJ disorders can develop.

TMJ disorders can be triggered by an accident, teeth clenching/grinding, or arthritis. Symptoms include facial or back pain, migraines, sensitive/sore teeth, limited jaw movement, or popping jaw joints.

Dental appliances can be made to stabilize your bite and help determine what, if any, further dental treatments may be needed to keep you comfortable and pain free.

If you have any questions or concerns about your jaw pain or headaches, please do not hesitate to contact us. You can reach us at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Tooth Enamel and Tooth Decay

Woman smile - no tooth decay on her tooth enamelWhile tooth enamel is the body’s hardest substance, it’s not invincible. Certain foods/drinks, medications, acid reflux, and even oral bacteria can cause tooth decay and the overall thinning of the tooth’s surface.

Here are some simple ways to protect your teeth:

> Avoid carbonated beverages, over time they can eat away at your teeth.

> Don’t sip drinks through a straw. When you do, it increases the liquid’s exposure to your teeth and the potential damage to your teeth.

> Drink water after finishing an acidic drink, such as juice, wine, or carbonated beverages.  Washing away the acid with water, helps to keep your teeth healthy and strong.

> After drinking anything other than water, wait an hour before brushing your teeth. This gives your tooth’s enamel the time to remineralize.

> Choose a soft bristled toothbrush, it removes plaque without damaging your tooth enamel.

If you have any questions about your teeth or your oral health, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also, be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Smoking and Your Teeth

Woman Smoking in the park

It is no surprise that smoking is bad for your health (and the health of those around you). Smoking can negatively impact your oral health in many ways. Here are some ways that smoking affects your teeth:

> Staining: Over time, tobacco can seep into the pores of your tooth enamel and darken the colour of your teeth. Regular dental cleanings and professional whitening can help with the discolouration, but it is possible that neither approach will completely remove the deep stains.

> Oral Cancer: Approximately 90% of those with oral cancer have used tobacco. If you are a tobacco consumer, regular dental appointments can play a vital role in early oral cancer detection. Our dental team does routine oral cancer screenings at every dental cleaning appointment.

> Gum Disease: Smoking damages the mouth and gums, increasing your likelihood of experiencing gum disease. If you smoke, proper brushing and flossing is vital to help maintain the health of your teeth and gums.

> Sensitive Teeth: There is more bacteria in your mouth when you smoke, causing plaque to develop more easily. This can lead to inflamed gums and sensitive teeth.

> Bad Breath: Mouth washes and oral sprays cannot fully remove the lingering odour of smoking.

> Lower Immunity: Smoking lowers your body’s ability to fight infection. If you get gingivitis or gum disease, it will be harder for your body to recover. Also, if you require oral surgery, it will take longer for your mouth to heal. Smoking after surgery may even cause infection.

Your body can recover from the negative affects of smoking. When you quit smoking, your chances of oral health problems greatly decrease. Recent studies found that after eleven years, a former smokers’ likelihood of experiencing gum disease is similar to those who have never smoked.

Even cutting down the amount of smoking can significantly improve your oral health. Another study found that when people reduced their smoking habit by half, they also halved their likelihood of experiencing gum disease.

We understand that quitting smoking can be difficult. If you are an occasional, frequent, or former smoker, we can help improve your oral health. Regular visits to the dentist as well as daily brushing and flossing can give you a healthier, more beautiful smile.

If you have any questions about your oral health and the affects of smoking on your teeth, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also, be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Teeth Grinding and Children

children smiling and teeth grinding

Grind, grind, grind! If this sounds familiar, you’re living with a teeth grinder.

Teeth grinding, or bruxism, is not only common in adults, it is common in children too. In fact, three out of ten kids clench or grind their teeth at night. This can be a response to jaw growth, losing teeth, stress, or other discomforts, such as infections or allergies.

Grinding can cause irreversible damage to their teeth – leaving them chipped, worn down, or loose. Other symptoms of grinding include:

> Tightness or pain in the jaw

> Sensitive teeth

> Headache, earache, or facial pain

Typically, children outgrow this nightly habit. Grinding and clenching is usually a passing phenomena that most children stop doing by their teen years.

If you can concerned that you or your child is grinding or clenching at night, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also, be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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What is the Best Toothpaste?

best toothpaste

With the dozens of toothpastes available, we are regularly asked, “Which one is the best?” From being advertised as tartar controlling, whitening, anti-cavity, breath-freshening, and with fluoride, it can be a little overwhelming to find the right one.

We are here to help you decode the toothpaste aisle. Here are some guidelines for choosing (and using) toothpaste:

> Ignore brand names
There is no best toothpaste brand. Most contain ingredients recommended by the Canadian Dental Association. If you have a favourite brand, use it. It is important to find one that has a flavour and consistency that you enjoy.

> Use fluoride toothpaste
With the many different toothpaste packages proclaiming tartar control, anti-cavity, and sparkling mint crystals, the one thing you should definitely look for is fluoride. Fluoride is one of the most important elements in preventing tooth decay. Brushing with fluoride toothpaste twice a day will help maintain your oral health.

> Brush longer
For best results, brush your teeth for about two minutes. This will help you get the full benefit of your toothpaste’s fluoride and bacteria-scrubbing foam.

> Less is more
TV commercials often show a long, looping strand of toothpaste being squeezed onto a brush. You actually don’t need that much – a pea-sized amount of toothpaste is more than enough.

> Floss
We know that this has nothing to do with toothpaste, but flossing is very important. It doesn’t matter how carefully you weigh your options in the toothpaste aisle if you fail to floss. Flossing is one of the best things you can do for the health of your teeth and gums – so keep it up.

If you feel that your toothpaste is not doing a good enough job or if you have any special concerns such as sensitive teeth, receding gums, or discoloured teeth, talk to your dentist. We are always here to help. Please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also, be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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