Tag Archives: dental cavities

What is the Best Mouthwash?

Mouthwash

Mouthwash can help your breath smell fresher, reduce the amount of bacteria in your mouth, and prevent cavities and gum disease. But not all mouthwashes are created equal.

One ingredient that you’ll want to look for is fluoride. Fluoride is a naturally occurring chemical compound that is used in many dental care products as a way of preventing tooth decay and dental cavities. Most kinds of toothpaste contain fluoride, and many dental visits will include a fluoride treatment.

If you are prone to cavities, fluoride mouth rinses can protect your teeth. The fluoride coats your teeth and protects it from bacterial plaque. Adding a fluoride mouth rinse to daily brushing and flossing can help protect your teeth from cavities.

Mouthwashes can also be used to help treat gum disease. If you have gum disease, your dentist may recommend a mouthwash with chlorhexidine. Chlorhexidine is antibacterial, meaning it can help control and kill the bacteria in your mouth that causes gum disease.

Chlorhexidine mouthwashes are a wonderful short-term solution to help your mouth recover from gum disease treatment. Once your gums are healthy again, daily brushing and flossing with regular dental visits should help prevent any future gum disease problems.

If you have any questions or concerns about mouthwash or bad breath, please do not hesitate to contact us. You can reach us at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Stress and Your Teeth

Stress and Your Teeth

We all feel a little stressed sometimes. But did you know that excess stress can affect your teeth and gums? From mouth sores to tooth grinding or even gum disease, stress can cause some serious oral health problems.

Mouth Sores
When you already have an underlying condition, stress can cause blisters to form in your mouth. This type of blister is called a cold sore.

Cold sores are small fluid-filled blisters that can appear in and around the mouth. These contagious sores are caused by the herpes simplex virus. If you have a cold sore, talk to your dentist. It’s important to start treatment as soon as the sore starts to form.

Teeth Grinding
When you’re stressed, you may clench or grind your teeth. If you already clench or grind your teeth, stress can make this habit worse. Protect your teeth from breaks or chips, talk to your dentist about custom night guards. Night guards can help reduce the amount of strain on your teeth and protect them from damage.

Gum Disease
Did you know that stress can increase the amount of plaque in your mouth? It can also increase the risks for bleeding gums, gingivitis and gum disease. If you can’t minimize the stress in your life, try to eat a balanced diet and visit your dentist regularly. A healthy lifestyle, including daily brushing and flossing, can help reduce the risks of stress on your teeth.

If you experience a lot of stress, talk to your dentist. We can recommend a solution, specifically designed for your needs. You can contact us at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Sensitive Teeth – Hot (And Cold) Tooth Talk

Sensitive Teeth

Do you have sensitive teeth? Do you wish you could eat and drink more comfortably? Whether you are sensitive to hot or cold, most people experience tooth sensitivity at some point. This discomfort can range from mild to severe and it can affect your daily life and eating habits.

Why are my teeth sensitive?
Teeth can be sensitive for many reasons. It can be caused by tooth decay or fracture. Other times, the gums that protect the roots of your teeth can recede, exposing the roots.

How can you treat sensitive teeth?
Depending on the cause of the sensitivity, treatment can be as simple as switching toothpaste. A toothpaste specifically designed for sensitive teeth can provide relief and long-lasting protection for sensitive teeth. In other cases, a root canal or gum grafting may be needed to give you the comfort you needed.

If you have sensitive teeth, talk to your dentist. We can recommend a solution, specifically designed for your needs. You can contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Five Steps to Spring Cleaning Your Teeth

spring-cleaning-for-your-teeth

It’s not just for your home, spring cleaning is also important for your teeth.  Spring is the perfect time to tackle any oral hygiene problems and schedule your six-month appointment with your dentist.

The dust and cobwebs that can build up around your home might be easy to find, but the plaque in your mouth might not.  Let your dentist/hygienist give you the clean, healthy mouth you deserve.

Consistent oral hygiene is vital, especially considering the recent links between oral health and your overall health.  The bacteria associated with gum disease has been linked with heart disease, blood clots, stroke, Alzheimer’s, breast cancer, and diabetes.

Steps to Spring Clean Your Teeth

Step 1: Visit Your Dentist – This will ensure that any signs of gum disease are spotted and treated as soon as possible.

Step 2: Replace Your Toothbrush – Every three to four months, your toothbrush should be replaced. Once the bristles are worn, your toothbrush is no longer working effectively.

Step 3: Eat Fresh Fruit and Vegetables – They are good for you and the chewing action stimulates saliva, reducing the build-up of bacteria.

Step 4: Brush Your Teeth Twice a Day for Two Minutes –  Brushing and flossing your teeth before you are too tired at night helps ensure that you are doing it correctly, making it also feel like less of a chore.

Step 5: Floss Your Teeth Daily –  Floss reaches the areas of your mouth that your toothbrushes can miss, removing food particles, plaque and bacteria.

If you’d like to book an appointment or if you have any questions or concerns about your oral health, please do not hesitate to contact us. You can contact us at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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National Children’s Dental Health Month

National Children’s Dental Health Month

In honour of February being National Children’s Dental Health Month, our entire team at the Centre Dentaire Lasalle want to remind you that it is so important to take care of your children’s oral health.  A beautiful, healthy smile is not only attractive, it is an important part of maintaining a healthy body.

Four Steps to a Healthy Mouth

Step 1: Proper Home Care – Remember to help your children brush their teeth twice a day and don’t forget to floss.

Step 2: Eat a Balanced Diet  Healthy food is important for everyone’s teeth, especially kids. Regularly eating fruits and veggies make your children’s teeth less susceptible to cavities and tooth decay.

Step 3: Visit the Dentist Regularly – Don’t wait until something hurts. Regular dental appointments help you and your family maintain a healthy mouth, letting you live a healthier life.

Step 4: Apply Dental Sealants –  Children commonly get cavities on the chewing surface of their teeth. Dental sealants help protect your child’s teeth. By applying a thin plastic film to the chewing surface of the tooth, food and bacteria cannot reach the narrow grooves in the tooth and form into cavities.

If you have any questions or concerns about you or you child’s oral health, please do not hesitate to contact us. You can contact us at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Women and Oral Health

Women and Oral Health

We’ve all heard about the differences between men and women. While some are obvious, when it comes to oral health, women need to take extra special care of their teeth and gums.

Studies indicate that there is a gender-specific connection between women’s hormones and oral health. Women undergo various hormonal changes – from puberty to pregnancy and finally menopause. Fluctuating hormone levels can affect oral health.

Hormonal changes can make a woman’s mouth a breeding ground for bacteria. With more bacteria in the mouth, women can more easily encounter cavities, gum disease, and other oral health issue. If oral bacteria enters the bloodstream, it can also negatively impact a woman’s overall health.

Oral bacteria has been linked to:

  • Pregnancy outcomes: Pregnant women with gum disease have an increased chance of per-term births and low birth weight babies.
  • Stroke: When bacteria in the mouth enters the bloodstream, it can form into a clot. If the clot grows, it can cause a stroke.
  • Breast cancer: Women with poor oral health (gum disease) may be 11 times more likely to develop breast caner.
  • Heart disease: Those with gum disease have a higher risk of heart disease and are twice as likely to encounter a fatal heart attack.
  • Respiratory problems: Oral bacteria can travel into the lungs and cause respiratory problems, such as pneumonia.

While women tend to take better care of their teeth, it is essential for them to be extra vigilant to maintain good oral and overall health. On top of daily brushing and flossing, we recommend that women, men, and their families visit their dentist regularly

If you have any questions or concerns about your dental needs, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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The Truth About Cavities

The Truth About Cavities

Dental cavities are extremely common, second to the common cold. They occur when acid, caused by bacteria, breaks through the tooth’s outer surface and infects its inner core. There are a lot of misunderstandings around the causes of cavities. Protect your teeth, know the right facts.

Top Ten Truths and Misconceptions About Cavities

1. Sugary Foods/Drinks Cause Cavities: True and False.
Oral bacteria thrives on sugar. When you eat anything with sugar, oral bacteria produces acid, which can make tiny holes (cavities) in your teeth. Don’t avoid sugar all together, simply avoid spending all day sipping sugary drinks and sodas. If you drink sugary drinks, rinse your mouth with water.

2. Acidic Foods Cause Tooth Decay: True.
Eating lemons and drinking sodas can erode tooth enamel. Overtime, this weakened tooth may expose its underlying dentin, making it more prone to decay.

3. Children Are More Prone to Cavities: True.
Since their teeth are softer and still developing, children are more prone to cavities. Dental sealants, fluoride treatment, and preventative care can lessen the risk. At the other end of the spectrum, seniors are also prone to cavities. The side effects to many medications is dry mouth. A dry mouth is a breeding ground for cavities and tooth decay. If you have a dry mouth, drink plenty of water and visit your dentist/hygienist regularly.

4. All Dental Fillings Need Replacing: False.
A dental fillings life expectancy is based on how well you care for it. If you brush and floss daily, and visit your dentist/hygienist regularly, your filling will last longer. But if you don’t properly care for it, like with your original tooth, it will break down.

5. You Know When You Have a Cavity: False.
The pain that is commonly associated with cavities is when decay is advanced and the nerve is damaged. A small cavity may not have any symptoms. But if it is left untreated, the infection can enlarge, leading to more extensive and expensive procedures.

6. Treating A Tooth Repairs Decay: True.
Once a cavity is filled and properly cared for, you typically will not get another infection in the same spot. If the tooth is not properly cleaned and the old filling breaks down, bacteria can get inside and decay can begin again.

7. Cavities Are More Likely Between Teeth: True.
Decay can happen anywhere, especially in those hard to reach places. That is why it is so important to brush and floss your teeth and visit your dentist/hygienist regularly.

8. Chipped/Cracked Teeth Can Decay: True.
If you grind/clench your teeth at night, they are more prone to chips and breaks. These are prime hiding paces for bacteria because they are harder to clean and overtime are more prone to decay. Wear a night guard and protect your teeth while you sleep.

9. Crooked Teeth Are More Prone to Cavities: True.
Crooked or misaligned teeth are more likely to get cavities, gum disease, or premature wearing. Straightening your teeth is not just cosmetic, it is healthier and they are easier to clean.

10. You Don’t Need to Worry About Cavities in Baby Teeth: False.
Baby teeth hold the space for permanent teeth. If these cavities are left untreated, it can lead to serious pain, and the bacteria can spread to other areas of the body.

Good home oral care and regular dental appointment are essential for preventing cavities. If you brush and floss daily, removing the bacteria from all surfaces of your teeth, you will help protect your oral and overall health.

If you have a cavity or have any questions about oral care, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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