Tag Archives: baby

How to Care for Your Baby’s Teeth

steps to care for baby's teeth

In the first few months, you fall in love with your baby’s sweet gummy smile. Underneath those gums, your child already has the beginnings of their baby and adult teeth. To help keep your baby’s teeth healthy throughout childhood and adulthood, here are some simple steps.

Step 1 – Clean Your Child’s Teeth and Gums:
Even before your infant’s teeth come in, start wiping the gums with a damp cloth, gauze, or infant toothbrush. As soon as the teeth begin to erupt, you should be brushing your child’s teeth twice a day.

Step 2 – Avoid Bedtime Bottles:
Try not to give your baby a bottle at bedtime. If your child needs something comforting, try a bottle filled with water, not sugary drinks.

Step 3 – Avoid Sugary Pacifiers:
Do not dip your child’s pacifiers in anything sweet, even honey. Only use clean, orthodontic pacifiers, which are actually designed for the shape of your child’s mouth.

Step 4 – Minimize Teething Pain:
When teeth begin to come in, your child may experience some pain. Teething rings can be helpful. You can also help by rubbing your baby’s gums with a clean finger.

Step 5 – Visit the Dentist:
While planning your child’s first birthday party, remember to book their first dental appointment. At this appointment, we will review proper brushing technique and how to avoid potential issues. Many parents are unaware of dental issues until they become more serious. And your child will learn that going to the dentist is important for oral health.

If you have any questions about your child’s teeth or notice anything unusual, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also, be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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When Should a Child Start Using Toothpaste?

Young girl brushing her teeth

Taking care of a small child can feel like a full-time job. With diaper changes, bath time, bedtime routines, and mealtime, parents also need to care for their child’s teeth.

To make your day a little easier, we have some helpful guidelines for everyday oral care for your child from birth through toddlerhood.

Birth to 18 Months
As soon as your child’s teeth begin to come in, it is time to start cleaning them. For babies younger than 18 months, the best way to clean your child’s teeth is with a wet cloth or gauze and without toothpaste.

Gently rub the teeth and gums with a cloth over your fingertip. Along with nursing, formula and/or water, this is the only oral care that your young child needs. Once there is a full set of teeth, you can use a small, soft bristled toothbrush and water.

When to Start Toothpaste
Once your child is 18 months old, look for a toothpaste specially formulated for children. Young children have different dental needs and children’s toothpaste caters to these needs.

What to Look for in Children’s Toothpaste
> Safe to swallow: Young children tend to swallow their toothpaste rather than spitting it out. Make sure that your children’s toothpaste is formulated with this in mind.
> Pea-sized amount: Your child doesn’t need a lot of toothpaste to be effective, you only need to use a pea-sized amount.
> Low-fluoride: Fluoride is an important element of keeping teeth healthy and strong, but too much fluoride can be harmful for young children. Several varieties of children’s toothpaste have lower amounts of fluoride.
> Fun flavours: Some children, especially toddlers, tend to be picky. Be prepared to try a few different varieties of toothpaste to see which one is the best.

By taking time each day – morning and night – to clean your child’s teeth, you are helping your child create a lifetime of healthy dental habits.

If you have any questions about toothpaste or your child’s dental health, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also, be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Dental Teething Tips

Baby teething and mom

Babies typically get their first set of teeth (lower, middle) by six months old. While it is exciting to see your child’s gummy smile become a toothy one, it can be a painful process for your baby.

Signs of teething include:

– Biting down on objects or fingers
– Increased drooling
– Rash or redness on the cheeks
– Loss of appetite
– Tender, swollen gums
– Excess drool

To make the process as comfortable as possible, here are some dental teething tips:

Tip #1 – Massage your baby’s gums with your finger.

Tip #2 – Use a chilled (not frozen) teething ring.

Tip #3 – Let your child suck on a cold, wet cloth.

If your child is in a lot of discomfort, talk to your dentist about a teething ointment to numb the gums. Our dental team is here to answer any questions or concerns about your teeth, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also, be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Good Hygiene Habits for Parents and Children

Dental Health Parent and Child

On a hot summers day, have you ever shared an ice cream cone with a friend or family member? Chances are you’re not only sharing a delicious, refreshing snack, you’re also sharing oral bacteria.

Our mouths are filled with bacteria, millions of them. When you share food, cups, utensils, or toothbrushes, these bacteria can be transferred from person to person. This can be particularly harmful when sharing with children.

Since children’s immune systems are not fully developed, if a parent has tooth decay, the child is more likely to get cavities.

Here are some simple steps to keep you and your family’s mouths healthy and stop the spread of harmful oral bacteria:

Good Hygiene Habits for Children
> If your child sleeps with a bottle, fill it with water – not milk, formula, or juice.
> Before baby teeth erupt, clean your child’s gums with a wet cloth.
> Once baby teeth erupt, brush them twice a day.
> Book your child’s first dental appointment before his/her first birthday or when the first tooth appears.
> Avoid putting anything in your child’s mouth that has been in your mouth.
> Once teeth are touching, begin flossing daily.
> Change your child’s toothbrush every three months.
> Regularly examine your child’s teeth for changes in colour, lines, or spots.

Good Hygiene Habits for Parents
> Eat a well balanced diet and limit the amount of sugary sweets.
> Brush your teeth twice a day with fluoridated toothpaste and floss daily.

To ensure that you and your family maintain beautiful, healthy smiles, remember to visit the dentist regularly. If you have any questions about oral health, please contact our office at at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also, be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Oral Health for Women

woman and daughter, oral health for women

Did you know that there is a connection between women’s hormones, gum disease, and issues that impact women’s health?

From puberty to pregnancy and finally menopause, women undergo various hormonal changes. Fluctuating hormone levels can affect a woman’s oral health, making her mouth a breeding ground for bacteria. When there is more bacteria in the mouth, there is an increased chance that the bacteria will enter the blood stream and negatively impact her overall health.

Oral bacteria has been linked to breast cancer, pre-term births, low birth weight babies, and bone loss. While women tend to take better care of their oral health, it is essential for them to pay extra special attention to their oral health to protect their overall health.

Along with daily brushing and flossing, we recommend that women (and their families) visit the dentist regularly. These appointments help prevent gum disease and are essential steps to maintaining a lifetime of good oral and overall health.

If you have any questions or concerns about oral health for women and their families, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also, be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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How To Prevent Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

baby bottle tooth decay

Does your child have a bottle before bedtime? If it is filled with milk, formula, fruit juice, or sugary drinks, it can cause baby bottle tooth decay. Your child’s oral bacteria feeds on the bottle’s sugary liquid. When the liquid pools in the mouth, the bacteria can multiply, become acidic, and eat away at the tooth’s enamel, causing tiny holes (cavities).

The more frequently your child consumes these sugary beverages at night, the more likely he/she will develop baby bottle tooth decay. While the front teeth are the most susceptible, it can happen to all baby teeth.

Tooth decay can also occur if the baby falls asleep while drinking breast milk. If you want to prevent baby bottle tooth decay. Here are the three steps to follow:

1. Avoid the Bedtime Bottle
Give your child the day’s last bottle before the bedtime routine. If your child needs a late night bottle, only fill it with water.
2. Brush Every Day
For babies younger than 18 months, clean the gums with a wet cloth or infant toothbrush. Once the teeth begin to erupt, brush them twice a day.
3. Avoid Sugar Covered Pacifiers
If your child uses a pacifier, only use clean ones. Don’t dip them in anything sweet, even honey.

Baby bottle tooth decay is not just a problem for your child’s baby teeth. It can have a lasting effect on their adult ones, making them more susceptible to cavities and gum disease.

If your child’s teeth become sensitive or begin to develop white spots, contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website.  These are signs that your child may have baby bottle tooth decay. Also, be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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