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Dental Implants Can Change Your Life

dental implants can change your life

In the old days, it was common for people to lose their teeth. In fact, many elderly people could expect to lose all their teeth and wear dentures instead.

With the many advances in dental care, today it is increasingly rare for people to lose their teeth. But when tooth loss does occur, whether it’s from an injury (like a bike accident or car crash) or advanced tooth decay, dental implants are available to replace missing teeth.

Benefits of Dental Implants

– Attractive: Dental implants look almost exactly like real teeth. Your friends and family probably won’t be able to tell the difference.

Comfortable: Dental implants don’t cause discomfort. Unlike dentures, dental implants don’t pinch the mouth and cause pain.

Designed for Eating: Many patients find that dental implants perform almost the same as real teeth. Dental implants hold up well to the daily biting and chewing.

No Slurring Speech: Dental implants stay securely fitted inside your gums, so they won’t affect your ability to talk.

Convenient: Dental implants stay in one place, inside your mouth. You can brush and floss them the same as the rest of your teeth.

Long-lasting: If well maintained, dental implants can last for many years, often the rest of your life.

Healthy: Dental implants are a good choice because they don’t negatively impact the rest of your mouth. In fact, they tend to be better for your oral health

Beautiful Smile: Dental implants create a more natural-looking smile. There are no dentures to worry about, no bridgework to explain to others. You can get your teeth fixed and go on with your life.

We are now placing implants at our clinic, and we also offer sedation. If you have any questions about dental implants or cometic dentistry please do not hesitate to contact us.  You can reach us at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Sensitive Teeth – Hot (And Cold) Tooth Talk

Sensitive Teeth

Do you have sensitive teeth? Do you wish you could eat and drink more comfortably? Whether you are sensitive to hot or cold, most people experience tooth sensitivity at some point. This discomfort can range from mild to severe and it can affect your daily life and eating habits.

Why are my teeth sensitive?
Teeth can be sensitive for many reasons. It can be caused by tooth decay or fracture. Other times, the gums that protect the roots of your teeth can recede, exposing the roots.

How can you treat sensitive teeth?
Depending on the cause of the sensitivity, treatment can be as simple as switching toothpaste. A toothpaste specifically designed for sensitive teeth can provide relief and long-lasting protection for sensitive teeth. In other cases, a root canal or gum grafting may be needed to give you the comfort you needed.

If you have sensitive teeth, talk to your dentist. We can recommend a solution, specifically designed for your needs. You can contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Women and Oral Health

Women and Oral Health

We’ve all heard about the differences between men and women. While some are obvious, when it comes to oral health, women need to take extra special care of their teeth and gums.

Studies indicate that there is a gender-specific connection between women’s hormones and oral health. Women undergo various hormonal changes – from puberty to pregnancy and finally menopause. Fluctuating hormone levels can affect oral health.

Hormonal changes can make a woman’s mouth a breeding ground for bacteria. With more bacteria in the mouth, women can more easily encounter cavities, gum disease, and other oral health issue. If oral bacteria enters the bloodstream, it can also negatively impact a woman’s overall health.

Oral bacteria has been linked to:

  • Pregnancy outcomes: Pregnant women with gum disease have an increased chance of per-term births and low birth weight babies.
  • Stroke: When bacteria in the mouth enters the bloodstream, it can form into a clot. If the clot grows, it can cause a stroke.
  • Breast cancer: Women with poor oral health (gum disease) may be 11 times more likely to develop breast caner.
  • Heart disease: Those with gum disease have a higher risk of heart disease and are twice as likely to encounter a fatal heart attack.
  • Respiratory problems: Oral bacteria can travel into the lungs and cause respiratory problems, such as pneumonia.

While women tend to take better care of their teeth, it is essential for them to be extra vigilant to maintain good oral and overall health. On top of daily brushing and flossing, we recommend that women, men, and their families visit their dentist regularly

If you have any questions or concerns about your dental needs, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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The Truth About Cavities

The Truth About Cavities

Dental cavities are extremely common, second to the common cold. They occur when acid, caused by bacteria, breaks through the tooth’s outer surface and infects its inner core. There are a lot of misunderstandings around the causes of cavities. Protect your teeth, know the right facts.

Top Ten Truths and Misconceptions About Cavities

1. Sugary Foods/Drinks Cause Cavities: True and False.
Oral bacteria thrives on sugar. When you eat anything with sugar, oral bacteria produces acid, which can make tiny holes (cavities) in your teeth. Don’t avoid sugar all together, simply avoid spending all day sipping sugary drinks and sodas. If you drink sugary drinks, rinse your mouth with water.

2. Acidic Foods Cause Tooth Decay: True.
Eating lemons and drinking sodas can erode tooth enamel. Overtime, this weakened tooth may expose its underlying dentin, making it more prone to decay.

3. Children Are More Prone to Cavities: True.
Since their teeth are softer and still developing, children are more prone to cavities. Dental sealants, fluoride treatment, and preventative care can lessen the risk. At the other end of the spectrum, seniors are also prone to cavities. The side effects to many medications is dry mouth. A dry mouth is a breeding ground for cavities and tooth decay. If you have a dry mouth, drink plenty of water and visit your dentist/hygienist regularly.

4. All Dental Fillings Need Replacing: False.
A dental fillings life expectancy is based on how well you care for it. If you brush and floss daily, and visit your dentist/hygienist regularly, your filling will last longer. But if you don’t properly care for it, like with your original tooth, it will break down.

5. You Know When You Have a Cavity: False.
The pain that is commonly associated with cavities is when decay is advanced and the nerve is damaged. A small cavity may not have any symptoms. But if it is left untreated, the infection can enlarge, leading to more extensive and expensive procedures.

6. Treating A Tooth Repairs Decay: True.
Once a cavity is filled and properly cared for, you typically will not get another infection in the same spot. If the tooth is not properly cleaned and the old filling breaks down, bacteria can get inside and decay can begin again.

7. Cavities Are More Likely Between Teeth: True.
Decay can happen anywhere, especially in those hard to reach places. That is why it is so important to brush and floss your teeth and visit your dentist/hygienist regularly.

8. Chipped/Cracked Teeth Can Decay: True.
If you grind/clench your teeth at night, they are more prone to chips and breaks. These are prime hiding paces for bacteria because they are harder to clean and overtime are more prone to decay. Wear a night guard and protect your teeth while you sleep.

9. Crooked Teeth Are More Prone to Cavities: True.
Crooked or misaligned teeth are more likely to get cavities, gum disease, or premature wearing. Straightening your teeth is not just cosmetic, it is healthier and they are easier to clean.

10. You Don’t Need to Worry About Cavities in Baby Teeth: False.
Baby teeth hold the space for permanent teeth. If these cavities are left untreated, it can lead to serious pain, and the bacteria can spread to other areas of the body.

Good home oral care and regular dental appointment are essential for preventing cavities. If you brush and floss daily, removing the bacteria from all surfaces of your teeth, you will help protect your oral and overall health.

If you have a cavity or have any questions about oral care, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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The Best Time to Floss Your Teeth

Best Time to Floss Your Teeth

At Centre Dentaire Lasalle, we encourage all of our patients to practice good home oral care, including daily brushing and flossing, between regular dental appointments. Flossing helps remove food debris and plaque from the areas that your toothbrush can’t reach.

When food and plaque is not properly removed, the space between your teeth becomes a breeding ground for bacteria. This bacteria can cause tooth decay, cavities, and gum disease (periodontal disease). Recent studies also suggest that flossing can help prevent heart attacks and stroke.

Should You Floss Before or After Brushing Your Teeth?

Our dental team always recommends flossing before brushing. Flossing first allows your brush to remove the food and plaque that was dislodged from between your teeth.

When flossing, gently insert the dental floss between your teeth and move it up and down between the gums and teeth. Floss the sides of all of your teeth, even if there isn’t another tooth next to it. Remember not to skip the teeth that look or feel clean.

If it’s been a while since you’ve flossed your teeth, it may feel a little uncomfortable at first. Think of flossing your teeth like giving your gums a good workout. Whenever you start a new routine, your muscles (gums) may hurt a bit afterwards. But in no time, your gums will be stronger, leaving you with a healthier mouth and body, too.

Do you have any questions about flossing your teeth? If so, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Do You Have a Healthy Tongue?

Do You Have a Healthy Tongue?

When it comes to oral health, we often discuss your teeth and gums. Today we are going to talk about your tongue. Your tongue is quite an interesting muscle. It’s flexible, allowing you to create sounds and speak. It co-ordinates with your teeth and jaws, so you can chew food. It also has sensors, sensitive to heat, pain, tactile, and taste.

When it comes to taste, your tongue senses bitter, salty, sweet, and sour foods. As you age, the taste buds on the sides and roof of your mouth disappear. When people say tastes change, it’s because there are less taste buds in your mouth, so foods that were once too flavourful are now delicious.

To keep your tongue in tip-top shape. Here are three steps to tongue health:

Step 1: Avoid Tongue Bling

Save the jewellery for other parts of your body. A tongue piercing will likely get infected and reinfected. Since there are billions of bacteria in your mouth, a tongue piercing is a breading ground for bacteria. The piercing can also damage tongue nerves, alter taste buds, chip/break teeth, and cause receding gums.

Step 2: Brush Your Tongue

Your tongue is an important part of your mouth. Make gently brushing your tongue a part of your daily brushing and flossing routine. A clean tongue keeps your breath fresher and your mouth healthier.

Step 3: Self Tongue Exam

Since oral cancer doesn’t always have uncomfortable side effects, detection often occurs by recognizing the symptoms and having regular dental appointments. To do a self tongue exam, stick your tongue out, examine the top, bottom, and sides in a mirror. If there are any cuts, red, or white patches that don’t go away in a couple weeks, contact your dentist. Inspecting your tongue and checking for signs of oral cancer are a huge part of routine dental appointments.

If it’s been a while since you’ve visited the dentist, book an appointment today.  You can contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Understanding Dental Pain

Understanding Dental Pain

Does your tooth ever ache? Does your mouth ever hurt? At the Centre Dentaire LaSalle we understand that oral pain is no fun. But if you’ve ever wondered why your mouth hurts, here are some explanations of the most common types of dental pain.

My tooth hurts when I eat/drink something hot or cold. Tooth sensitivity can be caused by tooth decay (dental cavity), worn tooth enamel, a cracked tooth, an exposed root, or even gum disease.

My tooth hurts when I eat or bite down. When a tooth hurts while eating, it can be a sign of tooth decay or a cracked/fractured tooth.

My tooth is throbbing. Intense, throbbing pain can indicate that your tooth is infected. If you are experiencing this pain with swelling, seek the attention of a dentist immediately. Your dentist can properly treat the infection before it spreads to other parts of your mouth or body.

My teeth are fine, but my jaw hurts. Jaw pain can be a symptom of teeth clenching or grinding at night, impacted wisdom teeth, or temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD).

Oral pain is not always crystal clear. Sometimes it can feel like a tooth is hurting in one place, but the problem is actually a couple teeth away. This type of referred pain can travel up or down the same side of the jaw.

Our dental team can help identify and treat the source of your pain. It is important to discuss any dental pain or discomfort with your dentist or hygienist. Even if it doesn’t seem like a big problem, different types of pain can be a signal of other health problems. For instance, if you have a history of angina or heart problems, pain on the left side of your mouth, jaw, or neck can be a sign of a heart attack. Women are more likely to experience this sort of signalled pain.

If you are experiencing oral pain or have any questions about it, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Are You Afraid of the Dentist?

afraid of the dentist

Do you worry about dental appointments? Does the sound of a drill make you flinch? If so, you’re not alone. Millions of people avoid the dentist every year because of traumatic childhood experiences, pain as adults, or negative TV/movie stereotypes.

To eliminate some of your fear, we have six steps to help you overcome any dental anxiety before visiting Centre Dentaire LaSalle.

> Step 1 – What Are You Afraid Of?
Is it the sounds? The equipment? An experience? Write down all of your fears, one by one.

> Step 2 – Don’t Wait
The more frequently you visit the dentist, the less dental work your mouth will need. Having regular dental appointments helps prevent many, if not most, dental problems.

> Step 3 – Bring a Distraction
Distracting your mind or listening to an iPod during your appointment is a great idea. Just close your eyes and get lost in the music.

> Step 4 – Relax
Inhale slowly, count to five, and then exhale slowly. Repeat this slow breathing until you feel more relaxed. It will help you feel more at ease during your visit.

> Step 5 – Ask
Before any procedure, ask our dental team any question. We are here to make your dental care experience as comfortable as possible. If you are ever concerned about something, just ask.

> Step 6 – We Are Here to Help
As health care professionals, we want to help improve your oral and overall health, and we will never judge you or the state of your mouth. Our dental team will do everything we can to ensure you have a comfortable, pain-free experience.

If you have have any questions or if you experience any dental fears, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also, be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Tooth Enamel and Tooth Decay

Woman smile - no tooth decay on her tooth enamelWhile tooth enamel is the body’s hardest substance, it’s not invincible. Certain foods/drinks, medications, acid reflux, and even oral bacteria can cause tooth decay and the overall thinning of the tooth’s surface.

Here are some simple ways to protect your teeth:

> Avoid carbonated beverages, over time they can eat away at your teeth.

> Don’t sip drinks through a straw. When you do, it increases the liquid’s exposure to your teeth and the potential damage to your teeth.

> Drink water after finishing an acidic drink, such as juice, wine, or carbonated beverages.  Washing away the acid with water, helps to keep your teeth healthy and strong.

> After drinking anything other than water, wait an hour before brushing your teeth. This gives your tooth’s enamel the time to remineralize.

> Choose a soft bristled toothbrush, it removes plaque without damaging your tooth enamel.

If you have any questions about your teeth or your oral health, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also, be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Healthy Eating for Your Teeth

Woman deciding to eat healthy for her teeth

With summer just around the corner, days are getting longer and busier. Packing nutrient-rich foods, helps strengthen yours and your children’s oral health, making everyone less susceptible to tooth decay.

Here are some tooth healthy foods that you can enjoy not only all summer, but all year round:

Dairy

Cheese, yogurt, and milk all contain calcium, which helps strengthen tooth enamel. When making lunches/snacks with cheese, try using aged cheddar, swiss, or monterey jack. These cheeses have been found to protect teeth from decay.

Fruits and Vegetables

It is no surprise that fruits and vegetables are good sources of vitamins. Citrus fruits contain vitamin C, important for healthy gums. While carrots and dried apricots contain vitamin A, which help build strong teeth.

Protein

Protein-rich foods, including meat, poultry, and fish, are good sources of phosphorous, a necessary mineral for tooth development. Nuts are a good alternative protein, they are rich in magnesium and phosphorous, which is optimal for oral health.

When packing lunches and snacks, try to avoid packing sodas, sports drinks, and sweetened fruit juices. These drinks are high in sugar and acid, which can contribute to tooth decay and obesity. Instead, opt for fluoridated water, milk, or pure fruit juice.

Introducing healthy eating habits at a young age is important for oral health and development. Health eating habits, hygiene habits, and maintaing regular dental appointments, are the building blocks for a lifetime of oral and overall health.

If you have any questions about oral health or tooth healthy foods, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also, be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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