Sensitive Teeth – Hot (And Cold) Tooth Talk

Sensitive Teeth

Do you have sensitive teeth? Do you wish you could eat and drink more comfortably? Whether you are sensitive to hot or cold, most people experience tooth sensitivity at some point. This discomfort can range from mild to severe and it can affect your daily life and eating habits.

Why are my teeth sensitive?
Teeth can be sensitive for many reasons. It can be caused by tooth decay or fracture. Other times, the gums that protect the roots of your teeth can recede, exposing the roots.

How can you treat sensitive teeth?
Depending on the cause of the sensitivity, treatment can be as simple as switching toothpaste. A toothpaste specifically designed for sensitive teeth can provide relief and long-lasting protection for sensitive teeth. In other cases, a root canal or gum grafting may be needed to give you the comfort you needed.

If you have sensitive teeth, talk to your dentist. We can recommend a solution, specifically designed for your needs. You can contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Top Ten Toothbrushing Mistakes

Top ten toothburhsing mistakes

You have the best intentions to brush your teeth, but if you’re not doing it the right way, you’re not getting the full benefit. Avoid our top ten toothbrushing mistakes to keep your smile healthy and clean.

Mistake #1 – Using the Wrong Toothbrush
Find a toothbrush that fits, literally. Look for a brush that is comfortable to hold in your hand and fits comfortably in your mouth. Both manual and electric toothbrushes can give you a good clean, as long as you are using them correctly.

Mistake #2 – Using a Hard-Bristled Toothbrush
When bristles are too hard, they can aggravate your gums. Use a soft-bristled toothbrush, which can effectively remove plaque without damaging your teeth.

Mistake #3 – Not Bushing Often Enough
It is important to remember to brush your teeth twice a day. With too much time between brushing, plaque bacteria can build up and increase your risk of gum inflammation, cavities, and other dental problems.

Mistake #4 – Brushing Too Hard
Brushing too vigorously can erode tooth enamel and cause gums to recede. Instead, use short, gentle strokes to clean your teeth.

Mistake #5 – Brushing at the Wrong Angle
Place your brush towards the gum line at a 45-degree angle, using short, vertical strokes.

Mistake #6 – Not Bushing Long Enough
Two minutes might feel like a long time, but it is what’s needed to give your mouth the cleaning it deserves. If two minutes feels too long, divide your mouth into four parts and clean each part for 30 seconds.

Mistake #7 – Missing the Inner Tooth Surfaces
It’s common for people to miss the inner surface of their teeth, the surface the tongue touches. Try to remember to clean all of your tooth’s surfaces – inner, outer, and chewing.

Mistake #8 – Using a Damp Toothbrush
If your toothbrush stays moist between brushings, it may become a breeding ground for bacteria. Keep your toothbrush upright, allowing it to dry between brushings.

Mistake #9 – Using an Old Toothbrush
Your toothbrush lifecycle is about three months, or less if you’ve been sick. If you want a reminder of when to change your toothbrush, do it at the beginning of each calendar season.

Mistake #10 – Not Flossing Afterwards
Clean all of your tooth’s surfaces, including the 30% your brush can’t reach. Make sure to floss your teeth at least one a day, after you finish brushing.

Along with brushing and flossing, it’s also important to schedule regular hygiene appointments, where your dentist/hygienist will monitor your oral health and screen for any dental problems that your can’t see.  You can contact us at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Do You Have Jaw Pain or Headaches?

Jaw Pain or Headaches

If you experience jaw pain, headaches, or have difficulty opening your mouth, you may have a TMJ disorder. Our dental team can determine if your bite may be a factor and help you feel comfortable again.

Temporomandibular joints (TMJ), are the joints that attach your jaws to your skull. These joints allow us to open and close our mouth, swallow, chew, and speak. When these joints, muscles, and teeth are not properly aligned, painful conditions such as TMJ disorders can develop.

TMJ disorders can be triggered by an accident, teeth clenching/grinding, or arthritis. Symptoms include facial or back pain, migraines, sensitive/sore teeth, limited jaw movement, or popping jaw joints.

Dental appliances can be made to stabilize your bite and help determine what, if any, further dental treatments may be needed to keep you comfortable and pain free.

If you have any questions or concerns about your jaw pain or headaches, please do not hesitate to contact us. You can reach us at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Not Flossing Your Teeth, What’s Your Excuse?

Not Flossing Your Teeth, What’s Your Excuse?

Flossing your teeth is an important part of your home oral care routine. Daily flossing helps you clean the areas of your mouth that your toothbrushes can miss, removing food particles, plaque and bacteria. If you’re not flossing your teeth, what’s your excuse?

My gums bleed or hurt when I floss.
Bleeding gums are a sign of gingivitis. Flossing your teeth can help gingivitis from developing into periodontal disease (a later stage of gum disease).

I have arthritis or It hurts my fingers.
If holding the floss between your fingers is difficult or uncomfortable, try using electric or manual flossing aids.

I’m too busy.
A healthy dental care routine (including regular visits to your dentist/hygienist) should not be time consuming. Your home care routine alone should not take more than ten minutes a day.  Investing a few minutes today can help you avoid the hours (and cost) of extensive restorative treatments down the road.

We understand that flossing can sometimes be a daunting task. It can feel uncomfortable and you might not know how to do it correctly. In fact, approximately 55 percent of people who floss their teeth, are not doing it correctly.

How Do I Floss?

  • Wrap the floss around your middle fingers, leaving about two inches between your fingers.
  • Using your index finger, slide the floss gently between your teeth.
  • Wrap the floss around the base of your tooth, just under your gumline.  Rub up and down, three to six times, flossing both sides of your tooth.
  • Repeat between each tooth and remember to floss the back of your molars.

It’s time to stop making excuses. Focus on the health benefits of regular home oral care, including brushing and flossing, and schedule a dental appointment with your dentist/hygienist today.   

If you have any questions or concerns about flossing your teeth or your oral health, please do not hesitate to contact us. You can contact us at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Five Steps to Spring Cleaning Your Teeth

spring-cleaning-for-your-teeth

It’s not just for your home, spring cleaning is also important for your teeth.  Spring is the perfect time to tackle any oral hygiene problems and schedule your six-month appointment with your dentist.

The dust and cobwebs that can build up around your home might be easy to find, but the plaque in your mouth might not.  Let your dentist/hygienist give you the clean, healthy mouth you deserve.

Consistent oral hygiene is vital, especially considering the recent links between oral health and your overall health.  The bacteria associated with gum disease has been linked with heart disease, blood clots, stroke, Alzheimer’s, breast cancer, and diabetes.

Steps to Spring Clean Your Teeth

Step 1: Visit Your Dentist – This will ensure that any signs of gum disease are spotted and treated as soon as possible.

Step 2: Replace Your Toothbrush – Every three to four months, your toothbrush should be replaced. Once the bristles are worn, your toothbrush is no longer working effectively.

Step 3: Eat Fresh Fruit and Vegetables – They are good for you and the chewing action stimulates saliva, reducing the build-up of bacteria.

Step 4: Brush Your Teeth Twice a Day for Two Minutes –  Brushing and flossing your teeth before you are too tired at night helps ensure that you are doing it correctly, making it also feel like less of a chore.

Step 5: Floss Your Teeth Daily –  Floss reaches the areas of your mouth that your toothbrushes can miss, removing food particles, plaque and bacteria.

If you’d like to book an appointment or if you have any questions or concerns about your oral health, please do not hesitate to contact us. You can contact us at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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National Children’s Dental Health Month

National Children’s Dental Health Month

In honour of February being National Children’s Dental Health Month, our entire team at the Centre Dentaire Lasalle want to remind you that it is so important to take care of your children’s oral health.  A beautiful, healthy smile is not only attractive, it is an important part of maintaining a healthy body.

Four Steps to a Healthy Mouth

Step 1: Proper Home Care – Remember to help your children brush their teeth twice a day and don’t forget to floss.

Step 2: Eat a Balanced Diet  Healthy food is important for everyone’s teeth, especially kids. Regularly eating fruits and veggies make your children’s teeth less susceptible to cavities and tooth decay.

Step 3: Visit the Dentist Regularly – Don’t wait until something hurts. Regular dental appointments help you and your family maintain a healthy mouth, letting you live a healthier life.

Step 4: Apply Dental Sealants –  Children commonly get cavities on the chewing surface of their teeth. Dental sealants help protect your child’s teeth. By applying a thin plastic film to the chewing surface of the tooth, food and bacteria cannot reach the narrow grooves in the tooth and form into cavities.

If you have any questions or concerns about you or you child’s oral health, please do not hesitate to contact us. You can contact us at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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2016 New Year’s Resolution

2016 New Year's Resolution

With a new year comes resolutions. You may have already decided to learn a new language, travel more, or spend more time with family. These are all good resolutions, but we have a few other ideas.

Floss Daily

Flossing helps prevent gum disease and helps keep the rest of your body healthy. If you have trouble flossing, that’s not an excuse. Try a dental flossing aid and feel free to ask anyone at the Centre Dentaire Lasalle how to use it.

Change Your Toothbrush

A toothbrush is not something you want to hold on to. You should replace your brush every three months, or earlier if the bristles appear worn.

Stop Smoking

Smoking can lead to a variety of illnesses including cancer, heart disease, and emphysema. It can also increase your risk of gum disease, stain your teeth, and lead to foul smelling breath.  This is the perfect year to quit smoking.

Wear a Sports Guard

Sports guards can protect your teeth from chipping, breaking, and even dislodging. They can also protect your jaw joints from trauma, a crucial component of concussion prevention.  Wear a custom mouth guard during any activity where you can get a blow to the face or mouth.

Don’t Use Your Teeth as Tools

This year, avoid using your teeth to open bottles, packages, or anything else.  Over time, these actions can cause your teeth to weaken, chip, and even break.

Whiten Your Smile

A brighter, whiter smile can make you feel more confident and more attractive to others.  Show off a beautiful smile to the world. You’re worth it.

Eat Plenty of Fruits and Vegetables

Fruits and vegetables are not only good for your overall health, they are also good for your oral health. Crisp fruits and raw vegetables, like celery and carrots, can clean plaque from your teeth and even freshen your breath.

Wear Your Seat Belt

Not only do seat belts save lives, they also protect your mouth from minor accidents, such as chipped, broken, and even dislodged teeth.  Buckle up – save your life and your smile.

Visit the Dentist Regularly

Make your dental health a priority this year. Visit your dentist regular, every six months. Your mouth will reward you.

If you have any questions or concerns about any of these dental resolutions or one of your own, please do not hesitate to contact us. You can contact us at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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Women and Oral Health

Women and Oral Health

We’ve all heard about the differences between men and women. While some are obvious, when it comes to oral health, women need to take extra special care of their teeth and gums.

Studies indicate that there is a gender-specific connection between women’s hormones and oral health. Women undergo various hormonal changes – from puberty to pregnancy and finally menopause. Fluctuating hormone levels can affect oral health.

Hormonal changes can make a woman’s mouth a breeding ground for bacteria. With more bacteria in the mouth, women can more easily encounter cavities, gum disease, and other oral health issue. If oral bacteria enters the bloodstream, it can also negatively impact a woman’s overall health.

Oral bacteria has been linked to:

  • Pregnancy outcomes: Pregnant women with gum disease have an increased chance of per-term births and low birth weight babies.
  • Stroke: When bacteria in the mouth enters the bloodstream, it can form into a clot. If the clot grows, it can cause a stroke.
  • Breast cancer: Women with poor oral health (gum disease) may be 11 times more likely to develop breast caner.
  • Heart disease: Those with gum disease have a higher risk of heart disease and are twice as likely to encounter a fatal heart attack.
  • Respiratory problems: Oral bacteria can travel into the lungs and cause respiratory problems, such as pneumonia.

While women tend to take better care of their teeth, it is essential for them to be extra vigilant to maintain good oral and overall health. On top of daily brushing and flossing, we recommend that women, men, and their families visit their dentist regularly

If you have any questions or concerns about your dental needs, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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The Truth About Cavities

The Truth About Cavities

Dental cavities are extremely common, second to the common cold. They occur when acid, caused by bacteria, breaks through the tooth’s outer surface and infects its inner core. There are a lot of misunderstandings around the causes of cavities. Protect your teeth, know the right facts.

Top Ten Truths and Misconceptions About Cavities

1. Sugary Foods/Drinks Cause Cavities: True and False.
Oral bacteria thrives on sugar. When you eat anything with sugar, oral bacteria produces acid, which can make tiny holes (cavities) in your teeth. Don’t avoid sugar all together, simply avoid spending all day sipping sugary drinks and sodas. If you drink sugary drinks, rinse your mouth with water.

2. Acidic Foods Cause Tooth Decay: True.
Eating lemons and drinking sodas can erode tooth enamel. Overtime, this weakened tooth may expose its underlying dentin, making it more prone to decay.

3. Children Are More Prone to Cavities: True.
Since their teeth are softer and still developing, children are more prone to cavities. Dental sealants, fluoride treatment, and preventative care can lessen the risk. At the other end of the spectrum, seniors are also prone to cavities. The side effects to many medications is dry mouth. A dry mouth is a breeding ground for cavities and tooth decay. If you have a dry mouth, drink plenty of water and visit your dentist/hygienist regularly.

4. All Dental Fillings Need Replacing: False.
A dental fillings life expectancy is based on how well you care for it. If you brush and floss daily, and visit your dentist/hygienist regularly, your filling will last longer. But if you don’t properly care for it, like with your original tooth, it will break down.

5. You Know When You Have a Cavity: False.
The pain that is commonly associated with cavities is when decay is advanced and the nerve is damaged. A small cavity may not have any symptoms. But if it is left untreated, the infection can enlarge, leading to more extensive and expensive procedures.

6. Treating A Tooth Repairs Decay: True.
Once a cavity is filled and properly cared for, you typically will not get another infection in the same spot. If the tooth is not properly cleaned and the old filling breaks down, bacteria can get inside and decay can begin again.

7. Cavities Are More Likely Between Teeth: True.
Decay can happen anywhere, especially in those hard to reach places. That is why it is so important to brush and floss your teeth and visit your dentist/hygienist regularly.

8. Chipped/Cracked Teeth Can Decay: True.
If you grind/clench your teeth at night, they are more prone to chips and breaks. These are prime hiding paces for bacteria because they are harder to clean and overtime are more prone to decay. Wear a night guard and protect your teeth while you sleep.

9. Crooked Teeth Are More Prone to Cavities: True.
Crooked or misaligned teeth are more likely to get cavities, gum disease, or premature wearing. Straightening your teeth is not just cosmetic, it is healthier and they are easier to clean.

10. You Don’t Need to Worry About Cavities in Baby Teeth: False.
Baby teeth hold the space for permanent teeth. If these cavities are left untreated, it can lead to serious pain, and the bacteria can spread to other areas of the body.

Good home oral care and regular dental appointment are essential for preventing cavities. If you brush and floss daily, removing the bacteria from all surfaces of your teeth, you will help protect your oral and overall health.

If you have a cavity or have any questions about oral care, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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The Best Time to Floss Your Teeth

Best Time to Floss Your Teeth

At Centre Dentaire Lasalle, we encourage all of our patients to practice good home oral care, including daily brushing and flossing, between regular dental appointments. Flossing helps remove food debris and plaque from the areas that your toothbrush can’t reach.

When food and plaque is not properly removed, the space between your teeth becomes a breeding ground for bacteria. This bacteria can cause tooth decay, cavities, and gum disease (periodontal disease). Recent studies also suggest that flossing can help prevent heart attacks and stroke.

Should You Floss Before or After Brushing Your Teeth?

Our dental team always recommends flossing before brushing. Flossing first allows your brush to remove the food and plaque that was dislodged from between your teeth.

When flossing, gently insert the dental floss between your teeth and move it up and down between the gums and teeth. Floss the sides of all of your teeth, even if there isn’t another tooth next to it. Remember not to skip the teeth that look or feel clean.

If it’s been a while since you’ve flossed your teeth, it may feel a little uncomfortable at first. Think of flossing your teeth like giving your gums a good workout. Whenever you start a new routine, your muscles (gums) may hurt a bit afterwards. But in no time, your gums will be stronger, leaving you with a healthier mouth and body, too.

Do you have any questions about flossing your teeth? If so, please contact our office at (514) 364-3366 or click here to visit our website. Also be sure to visit our Facebook page to keep up with information that affect your dental health and wellness.

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